Review: Coldplay’s “Everyday Life”

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Review: Coldplay’s “Everyday Life”

Album Cover; Parlophone Records

Album Cover; Parlophone Records

Album Cover; Parlophone Records

Album Cover; Parlophone Records

On November 22, Coldplay released their eighth studio album “Everyday Life.” It is a double album, with the first half titled “Sunrise” and the other “Sunset.” The album received generally positive reviews from critics, receiving an average score of 73 out of 100 based on 10 reviews on Metacritic.

The first track from the first half of the album is “Sunrise,” an orchestral song with a strong, leading violin. This type of song is one where you can let the music stir your imagination and create the lyrics as you see fit, you feel the music with your heart and connect to it in unique ways. The song is unique, melodic, and rather relaxing as well as inspiring. 

The second track is “Church,” an incredible song that is perfect for relaxing on a summer morning. This song holds gorgeous beats and amazing vocals, especially towards the end as an Arabic woman starts to vocalize in Arabic. This is the type of song to listen to when you need the motivation to keep going.

The fifth track of the first half and the fourth single is “Daddy.” This track is a soft, piano-driven song about a father and son relationship. The song is about the miserable relationship between them and how the son desires to see his father again, even for just one more time. This song is special in that so many people could relate to this very song.

The seventh track and co-lead single is “Arabesque,” a saxophone heavy song that holds intense angst and tension. The song is about the fear of Islam and the war going on against terrorism. This song is intense, with Chris Martin swearing for the second time ever on a Coldplay track, “same f**king blood.” 

The second track of the second half of the album is “Oprhans,” a seemingly happy sounding song that tackles the depressing subject of orphans dying because of bombings in war zones. At the first listen, you might not catch the meaning of the song beneath the upbeat music that makes you want to dance, despite there being nothing positive about the song. Nevertheless, it is a wonderful song with a powerful message.

The fourth track is “Cry Cry Cry,” an old school, groovy sounding song. This song shows that Coldplay is willing to go back to old-sounding music and that they can definitely pull it off. The lyrics of the song also can put the belief in someone’s head to take care of their environment.

The eighth and final track of the entire album and second single is, “Everyday Life.” This song is about the entire album as a whole, the message of love, pain, hope, and everyday life. It’s a gorgeous song that holds a warm feeling, that will help someone when they’re down. This track sounds like the song for the ending of a movie, but at the same time, can be the start of a movie as well. Both the warm ending and the warm beginning.

With this album, Coldplay has shown that they can get political but stay in the safe zone so that people won’t feel overwhelmed by political beliefs while listening and still make amazing music with powerful messages that inspire those who listen.

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